Renaissance Faire

Last Sunday I got to go to a wonderful Renaissance Faire which is held near the place I reside. In summary: it was absolutely fabulous. In fact, I’ll break tradition and show you a non-spinning-related picture. Here’s the costume I wore.

Actually, it turned out to be partially spinning-related because I made a felted pouch and belt to go with it. Believe it or not, the brown yarn I used was actually spun from some of the very first fiber I ever ordered online. My second ever fiber purchase. Ah, the memories. (I’ll get you some details on the belt and bag tomorrow.) The dress turned out just right. Not too hot, even though the sun was popping in and out of the clouds all day.

The Handspinning guild I went to late last year was there! And the wonderful lady who gave the talk on natural dyeing was doing an indigo pot. Wow. The colors she had sitting beside her. . . I think I’m going to faint. Gorgeous blues and blue-greens. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to actually hang around and watch her work, but we talked natural dyes for awhile. At the guild meeting she had mentioned getting things like goldenrod leaves at a shop at the Ren faire, so I decided to poke around and see if I could find it. I did, with the help of some friends, and here’s the result. A nice little bag of dried goldenrod leaves.

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I really wish I had summoned up the courage to ask the shop keeper if she had any other natural dye stuffs. Fie upon me for a cowardly spinner.

But at least I have the stuff to make a pretty gold color.

And, drum roll please, at another stall I hit the jackpot. A beautiful, carved mortar and pestle (quite sturdy) for $20. This beats a coffee-grinder in coolness any day. Not that it would be any less labor intensive, you understand. But I’ll feel ultra styling while I work.

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Now I’m back to three natural dyes calling me. After I did the cochineal dyeing it was down to two, much quieter. Now I have indigo, goldenrod, and cutch hollering at me to come and play. This calls for some serious yarn production. Which leads me to the two bags full of raw fleece I have lurking in the corner of the living room behind the couch. I need to get those cleaned soon, so I’m making plans for the Week of the Fleece. Total immersion (no pun intended) in scouring the entire, yes, entire batch of wool. You’ll note I said nothing about carding. I figure once it’s clean I can take my time.

2 Responses to Renaissance Faire
  1. outandin
    June 15, 2009 | 6:15 pm

    That is a beautiful mortar and pestle. I have a ceramic one but it’s always been my dream to own a largish one made of marble for grinding up herbs and spices in. The best one I ever had was a Japanese set that was given to me by a friend from Japan. The bowl was ceramic but the inside was covered with tiny grooves. The pestle was made from wood. That combination made short work of just about anything! I was very sorry to have to leave it behind in Africa . . . .

    Oh, and by the way, are you interested in any llama fleece? I can get get quite a lot if you are interested. Some is black and some is brown like the alpaca I sent you. It’s almost as soft as alpaca.

    And we’ll have to see about getting some fiber artists at our renfaire next year . . . .

  2. Rebekah
    June 16, 2009 | 9:25 am

    I’d love to give llama a try! Thank you very much. :)

    I’d volunteer to come to the renfaire as a fiber artist, but it might be a bit of a long stay.

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