The Results Are In

Fall-Dyed Fleece

Fall-Dyed Fleece


The fall-colored fleece has scored pretty high on my “favorite self-dyed fluff” list. The camera turned the red a little magenta-y, but it’s pretty true. I can hardly wait to start carding it! Hurry up and dry!

I’m thinking I will separate the colors when I card it to try to maintain relatively clear color shifts. In fact, I may play around with how I put the fiber on the carders. I’m almost wishing I had dyed more fleece when I did, although I only dyed one of the silk hankies—and in order to keep the right silk-to-wool ratio, I had to use just twice as much wool as silk. Which meant two ounces of wool. So, come to think of it, I bet I did way more anyway. Dyeing both hankies would have been the simplest route to take, but I didn’t want to risk ruining both hankies if something went wrong.

But, on a positive note, even though I wound up having to run for extra fiber due to a dye surplus (again), I absolutely love all the finished products.

Leafy Green

Leafy Green


The hankie turned out well, too. I’m glad I put more dye on it than I thought it would need because it turned out a lot lighter than I planned. But that’s okay. For the record, I pre-soaked the hankie for almost twenty-four hours, then laid it in an old cake pan for dyeing and baking. I did my usual “mix the dye, water, vinegar, and pour” thing, then covered the pan with tin foil and baked it for a little over an hour at 175 degrees farenheit. It’s almost the lowest the oven can go because, supposedly, if you get silk too hot you ruin some of the shine.

I’m guessing it wasn’t too hot, because look at this! I’m getting happy-fiber waves just thinking about it.

Silk, Silk, Silk

Silk, Silk, Silk

And, while I actually remembered to flip the hankie over and make sure the back got well dyed, I didn’t think to do it for the sock fiber. It had huge white blobs of undyed fiber in it. So I wound up dyeing it a second time, specifically aiming for those pesky blotches. I got most of them out. A few little spots won’t hurt. One thing that had me puzzled, though, was where the bamboo went.

Finished Roving

Finished Roving


My acid dyes weren’t supposed to work on bamboo, and thus the bamboo would leave little white streaks. When the roving came out of the pot the only white I could see were those big bare spots, and I didn’t think the mill would have done that bad of a job in blending.
Turns out the bamboo appears as the fiber dries. It left all these beautiful streaks through the fiber. I particularly like it on the greens. It reminds me of malachite.

Bamboo Streaks

Bamboo Streaks

Oh, and I finished the red scarf, but I don’t have any pictures of it because I finished it while I was at the recipient’s house. And said little recipient was very eager to get it. It still curled a bit after some make-shift blocking. Now I’ve got to get back to the merino/silk scarf and stop eyeing crochet patterns!

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